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Vanishing Yeast Rolls

by Victor @ Taste of Artisan

Two yeast rolls with golden brown tops on a white plate. This is what I consider the ultimate yeast rolls recipe. The rolls come out exceptionally flavorful, very soft, moist and flaky. They are pure perfection. They melt in your mouth and have a tendency to vanish in the blink of an eye, just like those good old Vanishing Oatmeal Cookies. I call these rolls the Vanishing Yeast Rolls. Make sure to make the full batch. They just go.

The challenge with yeast rolls

I have a few yeast roll recipes that I like but none of them is perfect. My favorite rolls would often lack that moist, airy crumb and flakiness I was looking for. Or they would be fine inside but pale and unattractive on the top. I’ve been experimenting with different flours and dough hydration, but with mixed results.

A top down view of a baking pan full of golden brown topped yeast rolls in a baking pan.

The solution

Then, I once had to make a double batch for a larger party and used a 10 x 14 inch rectangular cake pan for baking. I divided the dough into 15 pieces and arranged the dough balls into 5 rows of 3. The rolls came out bigger and tasted almost how I wanted. It suddenly struck me: smaller yeast rolls dry out faster during baking and lose their softness and moisture. It’s common sense, but somehow it was eluding me. I think the reason was that I was trying to get them perfect on the inside as well as those beautifully browned tops. Striking the balance between the two is what I think led to mixed results.

Angle view of a baking pan full of golden brown topped yeast rolls in a baking pan.

Some additional experimentation suggested that I should drop hydration a little as it interfered with getting perfectly browned tops. But this did not interfere with getting the crumb soft and moist as the size of the rolls was twice as big now.

Baking pan placement was another contributing factor to getting optimum results. I can never get perfectly browned tops in my oven if I bake on the middle rack, as many recipes advise. When I bake on the top rack I get exactly what I am looking for.

View at an angle of golden tops of yeast rolls in a baking pan.

These yeast rolls are best served fresh, but they will stay moist and soft for 2-3 days. Just make sure you keep them in a tightly closed container.

Two hands pulling two yeast rolls apart, flaky dough visible.

View at an angle of golden tops of yeast rolls in a baking pan.

Vanishing Yeast Rolls

The best rolls, period. They will keep fresh for up to 2-3 days in a tightly closed container. You may want to toast them for best results. If you decided to scale down the recipe, make sure to use a proportionately smaller cake pan to keep the size of the rolls unchanged.
4.91 from 21 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: dinner
Cuisine: American
Keyword: dinner rolls, yeast rolls
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Rising and proofing: 2 hours 20 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 15 rolls
Calories: 230kcal
Author: Victor

Ingredients

For the dough:

  • 6 cups all-purpose flour (900 g; King Arthur all-purpose flour recommended)
  • 2 1/3 cups water (520 g; see note 1)
  • 1/4 cup sugar (50 g)
  • 2 tsp kosher salt (10 g)
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 4 Tbsp vegetable oil
  • 4 tsp rapid rise yeast (18 g; see note 2)

For the egg wash:

  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp water (or milk)

Instructions

  • Mix all of the dough ingredients in a large bowl, cover and let the dough rest for 5 minutes.
  • Knead the dough by hand right in the bowl for about 2-3 minutes. The dough should be soft slightly tacky, but not not sticky. If the dough is sticky, let it rest for another 10 minutes and then knead again for 1-2 minutes. As the flour in the dough absorbs more water the stickiness will go away. Cover the bowl with a damp kitchen towel or saran wrap and place in warm place for 1.5 hours to rise. The dough needs to double in size. If not, let it continue to rise until it does.
  • Divide the dough into 15 equal pieces. Shape each piece into a ball. Some flour can be added in this step if the dough is too sticky, but normally this is not needed. Grease your palms with soft butter and butter each dough ball. This will allow better separation of the yeast rolls after they are baked and help with browning.
  • Place the dough balls in a well-greased 10 x 14 inch cake pan, arranging them into 5 rows of 3. Cover the pan with a damp towel or saran wrap and proof for 40 minutes in warm place
  • Preheat oven to 375F.
  • Whisk one whole egg with a teaspoon of cold water or milk until well blended. Brush the tops of the dough balls with a light, even coat of egg wash.
  • Place the pan in the oven and bake for 25-27 minutes until golden brown.
  • Serve and enjoy!

Notes

Note 1 - you can use warm (about 80F - 90F) water which will result in a quicker rise; however, longer rise will result in better flavor development. There is a bit of a trade off there. If you are too worried about the dough not rising in time and such, it makes sense to use warm water.
Note 2 - this recipe is designed for rapid rise (also known as instant or bread machine) yeast. Traditional (or active dry as it was formerly marketed) yeast has a larger granule and needs to be dissolved in water before using, while rapid rise yeast has a finer texture and can be mixed right into dry ingredients. You can use traditional yeast, but it needs to be first dissolved in warm water (about 100F - 105F) with a little bit of sugar. Let it sit for about 10 minutes until you see foam formed on top. At this point the yeast is ready to be used.

Nutrition

Calories: 230kcal | Carbohydrates: 41g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 4g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 10mg | Sodium: 317mg | Potassium: 57mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 15IU | Vitamin C: 0.2mg | Calcium: 10mg | Iron: 2.4mg

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87 comments

Peggy Lou December 19, 2019 - 4:48 am

Dear Victor, I love this recipe. It made excellent hot rolls for a family dinner. My kids tell me I should have a cooking blog, but after I read all of the comments below, I remember why I never share recipes. I can teach people to cook if they are with me, but most folks are too inventive if they are reading a recipe and then, fuss at me when the food turns out different from mine. You have the patience of a saint!

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Victor @ Taste of Artisan December 19, 2019 - 11:43 pm

Thank you for the kind words, Peggy. A chef I worked with many years ago once said that if he taught 10 people how to make a dish, he’d get 10 different results. We are all unique and our cooking reflects that. It’s way more fun that way but makes it hard to teach as you pointed out. Still, I love to cook and love to share my recipes…

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Melanie November 26, 2019 - 3:25 pm

I’ve never made rolls without eggs or milk so I’m surprised this is all of the ingredients. Can the dough be mixed in a bread machine first?

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Victor @ Taste of Artisan November 26, 2019 - 4:18 pm

There are many different ways to make rolls, this is just another way to make them. I don’t own a bread machine, never used one, so I can’t provide an informed answer to your question. That said, I don’t see why one couldn’t mix dough in a bread machine since it has a mixing function.

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Corinne November 26, 2019 - 1:55 pm

My husband’s grandmother made the tallest, airiest yeast rolls — they were a highlight of every holiday meal or family gathering. The family has been trying to replicate her rolls for over 20 years. Guess who finally won? Thanks, Victor! (Thanks, too, for the weight measurements. Our grandmas had decades of daily baking experience and could adjust a recipe by feel. We casual bakers need a bit more precision to get those great results.)

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Victor @ Taste of Artisan November 26, 2019 - 2:08 pm

You are very welcome, Corinne. So glad that your family liked my recipe.

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Trisan November 20, 2019 - 12:53 pm

Definitely my go to roll recipe from now on! I’ve been trying to replicate rolls my mother made as a child. This is the closest I’ve come ever! Im going to use potato water in my next batch… hopefully I won’t ruin the outcome.
Thank you for sharing this recipe!

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Victor @ Taste of Artisan November 20, 2019 - 1:16 pm

You are very welcome, Trisan. Thank you for your feedback and the kind words.

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Sharon Neal August 12, 2019 - 1:29 pm

Can a person use whole wheat flour in this recipe?

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Victor @ Taste of Artisan August 17, 2019 - 5:20 pm

Yes, you could, but I recommend a 50/50 blend for WWF and white flour.

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Sandra Baseio December 23, 2018 - 12:47 pm

I loved that!! Onr of the best rolls I ever made!

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Carol November 26, 2018 - 9:15 pm

What effect would adding a couple tbs of vital gluten have? I normally use just my normal inexpensive flour to make my rolls so add it but since I will be trying this with flour you suggest, I’m wondering if it would add or detract from finished rolls?

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victor November 27, 2018 - 11:28 am

Carol, by adding vital gluten what you are doing is creating bread flour, which has higher gluten content. It gives the buns a chewier texture. I have never tried this method though as I buy my flour from a bakery supplier in bulk, which is quite inexpensive. Bread flour is about 12.5% gluten, so you will need to find gluten/content content of your four and add a necessary amount of vital gluten to it accordingly.

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Elaine Davis July 11, 2018 - 3:00 pm

Can you use bread flour in this recipe ?

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victor July 11, 2018 - 5:47 pm

Yes, you can use use bread flour. I actually like using it as it gives buns a chewier texture.

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Winter June 25, 2018 - 3:39 pm

Hello, I made these yesterday and they tasted delicious, however, when they proofed the first time, the dough was HUGE! More than double in size as it popped the plastic wrap off my largest bowl. The second proof was just the same, so I ended up with gigantic rolls. I used the rapid rise yeast, KA flour and proofed in the oven with the light on, as recommended. Also, I live in Denver, so high altitude here. Is this normal and are there adjustments for altitude? Thanks!

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victor June 26, 2018 - 11:41 am

Interesting, thanks for sharing. I don’t any experience baking at high altitudes so can’t really help here but I hope someone who does will chime in.

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jen April 1, 2018 - 1:18 pm

Worried that when I brush the tops with the egg wash they will deflate? Have had it happen before and ruined a nice batch of rolls. (not with this recipe) What if I skip the egg wash all together? Mine are about ready to bake and look and smell fabulous!

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Halley November 11, 2019 - 12:45 am

Your rolls will be fine! The egg wash just gives a nice color!

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Jayden March 31, 2018 - 4:58 pm

Has anyone made the dough the night before and let it raise in the fridge over night? What do you think?

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jen April 1, 2018 - 1:20 pm

I’ll bet you could…might get a chewier dough though? I might try that when I have more time. I’d do it at the last rise so you can bring them to room temp and pop them right in the oven.

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Val December 30, 2017 - 5:00 pm

Thank you! Love the recipe.

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Val December 29, 2017 - 1:50 am

This is my go-to recipe for rolls now. We’ve had it both Thanksgiving and Christmas. I have some family coming for New Years who have a gluten sensitivity. Would you happen to know if I can substitute Caputo 00 flour for the KA AP? Or is it more complicated than that?

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victor December 29, 2017 - 2:03 am

Glad to hear that you liked my recipe. You certainly can try using Tipo 00 flour but I have not tested with it. It’s pretty close to AP, just ground more finely and usually contains less protein.

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Val November 20, 2017 - 1:47 pm

The egg doesn’t go into the dough but rather just used for the egg wash at the end correct? The first step in the instructions is incorrect.

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victor November 20, 2017 - 2:18 pm

Correct, the egg is for the egg wash only. Thanks for the correction in the first step – should say all except the egg wash.

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Kelly November 20, 2017 - 2:23 pm

Thanks for this recipe! I’ve made twice and am preparing two batches for Thanksgiving. I absolutely recommend using a scale for the measurements (along with any bread/baking!). It’s essential and gives me some peace of mind when testing new recipes. Thanks again!

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victor November 20, 2017 - 2:26 pm

Glad to hear that, Kelly. You are very welcome! This has been my go-to recipe for years. I’ve tried other ones, some were very good, but I keep coming back to this one. I can’t explain it but there is something special about it.

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Jeff November 17, 2017 - 8:40 pm

I believe this is the recipe i’ve Been looking for? I fixed this about a week ago and threw the whole thing in the trash. I sent away for a food scale…made a second batch today, measured out everything….now for my mistakes…I didn’t warm the water when mixing with the dry ingredients, I did’t have veg. oil since we seldom use it…the rolls took a long time for the initial raise, but they did raise…the profing raise proved my rolls were going to be “ heavy”. Which they were…don’t get me wrong they were good, but the third time will be a charm, as I will correct my mistakes and add a little potato liquid in place of some of the water…this should give me the light consistency I am looking for in a good dinner roll.

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sue November 13, 2017 - 7:27 pm

Can these be made the day before needed? partially? your suggestions, please.

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victor November 13, 2017 - 8:49 pm

You can cold retard the final proofing in a fridge overnight, then bake straight from the fridge in the morning. Or bake the day before, let cool to room temperature, then wrap with a Saran wrap.

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Tracy Sabb October 25, 2017 - 9:23 pm

Is there a substitute for the lemon juice, i’m allergic to all citrus fruits so no lemon juice.

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victor October 26, 2017 - 6:11 am

Yes, you can use white vinegar or white wine. Use half the amount of lemon juice.

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Darryl Anne McClellan July 29, 2017 - 3:13 pm

THANK YOU, PAMELA, FOR THE USA MEASUREMENT CONVERSION.
.

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Nata June 13, 2017 - 11:51 pm

I just today found your website.Your photos are fabulous and the recipes look tempting.

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victor June 14, 2017 - 12:47 am

Thank you for the kind words, Nata.

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Susan May 1, 2017 - 6:23 pm

Hi, Victor! I’m dying to try these! My Wolf range has a “proof” setting. Would that work for this recipe? Thank you in advance. PS I just stumbled across you blog and have found so many recipes to try already!

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victor May 2, 2017 - 3:01 pm

Hi Susan, the proof mode is a mode whereby a ‘warm’ temp is maintained in the oven to allow for yeast-leavened dough to rise, similar to turning oven light on which will maintain a temp of about 85F. Yes, it will work for this and any other recipe that requires dough proofing. Hope you like the results.

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Kim February 23, 2017 - 1:52 am

Hi
It’s delicious. Thank you!

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Pat Eden January 26, 2017 - 1:51 am

Is it possible to get this converted to cups and teaspoon measurements. I tried to convert it according to my printout and it never even rose. I don’t have a scales so I am lost . If you can, can you send t to my email address below?

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victor January 26, 2017 - 8:43 am

Hello Pat,

I explained why I don’t recommend using US measurements for this recipe, but if you insist, I provided the measurements in one of my comments above. They worked for some who tried.

Now, the problem with rising is a different issue. I think it may be related to the yeast. If you are using active dry yeast, the one with larger granules, it needs to be activated first. If you are using instant dry yeast, also called bread machine yeast, it can be mixed in dry as is. I made a clarification in the recipe. It can also be the ambient temperature. Make sure the dough is rising in a warm room. You can also place the bowl in a cold oven with the light on. It will provide a warm enough environment.

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Pat Eden January 26, 2017 - 8:13 pm

Thank you. I had set the bowl on top of the oven as I was using it, never thought about putting it inside the oven with the light on. I will try that. Yes I got the measurtements from a response to Sam!

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Kim June 13, 2018 - 10:27 pm

Hi Sam. Here’s the measurements.
6 cups all purpose flour
2 1/4 cups water
4 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 teaspoons lemon juice
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 teaspoons active dry yeast
1 egg and 1 teaspoon water or milk for egg wash.

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gina January 23, 2017 - 7:12 am

delicious!

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Judith December 23, 2016 - 1:21 pm

I don’t know how to measure in grams. Can you tell me the conversion into cups, ozs., etc.
Also, do you have to use an egg wash?

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victor December 23, 2016 - 2:58 pm

The conversion has already been posted a few comments up. This method is imprecise but it worked for some. The egg wash is not required, but the tops will look much better with it.

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Bonnie December 21, 2016 - 11:26 pm

Plz put the amounts in English like ounces and cups ,teaspoon, and tablespoons not in grams. I do know what the g stands for but I need it in English plz

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victor December 22, 2016 - 7:58 am

Grams are in English. Every kitchen scale sold in the US and Canada has both grams and ounces, so you should be just fine. I find grams a lot easier to use too. Say, 10 grams of Kosher salt in this recipe is 0.35274 ounces. For small home recipes ounces are less precise. Most of the bread baking books (American) I have show measures in grams for this very reason.

If you insist on using ounces, you can use an online conversion calculator to convert the rest of the metric measures.

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Evelyn Masiello December 10, 2016 - 7:26 pm

I just love this recipe it remembered me of Sunday dinners in my youth. I would have just liked if you would have use cup/Tbsp/tsp. Thanks for sharing your recipe, this is going to be my go to dinner rolls from now on. ( once I figure out the amounts.)

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victor December 10, 2016 - 7:31 pm

Thank you for your feedback, Evelyn. Some recipes like precision and this is one of them. I, and a few others, tried cups and spoons but the results were all over the place. If you want them perfect, you have to be precise. That’s the reason bread recipes use bakers percentages and measure ingredients in grams or ounces. Just get a cheap kitchen scale if you don’t have one and you won’t be using cups and spoons again. It’s much easier and much more precise.

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Clair December 10, 2016 - 3:01 pm

hi!

I am busy making these rolls right now… am concerned that the dough is not rising. leaving them for a while longer to give them a chance. Kneaded them well first time round .

I am particularly wondering why you don’t call for the water to be warmed for the yeast? I am new to breakmaking so am still learning, some recipes calling for warm water and some not… this one even just adds everything in altogether… another difference… so I am not too sure where i might be going wrong here.

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victor December 10, 2016 - 6:46 pm

Traditional yeast requires activating it with warm water or milk. Quick rise or bread machine yeast has a higher yeast cell count and does not need activation. You can use this yeast with cold water and mix everything together. The approach depends on what kind of dry yeast you are using. With cold water the dough rises slower, but develops better flavors. If you want the dough to rise faster, regardless of the yeast you are using, placing the bowl in a warm place helps. I like using a cold oven with the oven light on. This will create a warm environment that expedites yeast activity.

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Clair December 9, 2016 - 11:12 am

Can these be frozen before baking?

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victor December 10, 2016 - 6:41 pm

I’ve never frozen these particular rolls, but as any other dough they can be frozen just fine.

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Alison Richman November 28, 2016 - 4:15 pm

Have you ever tried using convection oven heat instead of the regular oven with these rolls? I’m having trouble with the center not cooking at the same rate as the sides when I put the pan near the top of the oven. Maybe putting the pan in the middle is best, but the tops don’t brown as much (as you noted somewhere). Just wondering if using convection heat might be better for cooking bread anyway. Thanks!

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victor November 28, 2016 - 5:01 pm

No, never tried that by I suppose it won’t hurt to try. Another things to try is to place the pan on a baking stone. I actually bake pretty much everything on a baking stone which permanently sits in my oven. Never had a problem that you are having.

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Alison Richman November 28, 2016 - 8:42 pm

Going to have to get one of those then. Thanks!

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Alison Richman November 24, 2016 - 5:06 pm

These are the best buns ever! Thank you for the recipe. Can you leave the rolls to rise overnight before baking?

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victor November 24, 2016 - 6:32 pm

Thank you for your comment, Alison. Yes, you sure can. I’ve done that with these rolls and my artisan baguettes, and the results were very good. You will get somewhat more airy texture. I kind of like it too. To make sure you don’t over-proof the dough, keep it in a cool room, even a fridge. But don’t put them in the fridge until after first rise and shaping.

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Alison Richman November 25, 2016 - 2:23 am

Perfect! That’s what I’m doing. That you for the quick reply. Rolls for our Thanksgiving Friday.

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victor November 25, 2016 - 10:27 am

You are very welcome.

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Alison Richman November 25, 2016 - 3:59 pm

Do you happen to know if there’s an ideal temperature in the middle of the pan/dough, when they’re done? I’ve heard 180, but not sure…

victor November 25, 2016 - 4:18 pm

Most breads are finished baking at about 190F. Breads enriched with butter, eggs, or milk are finished when the internal temperature is closer to 200F.

Indranina November 13, 2016 - 8:09 am

I’m interested in improving my breadmaking skills. Im enjoying your blog and following you.

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victor November 13, 2016 - 8:32 am

Thank you for your feedback, Indranina. Glad to hear you are enjoying my blog.

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Tracy September 5, 2016 - 2:59 am

These look amazing, I’m not super exerienced with baking with yeast and kneeding. I tried to make these and thought the flavor was good but when mixing the “stickiness” never went away (which is probably why the end product wasn’t as I expected), as recommended I added a little more flour but that didn’t seem to help much. The finished product was tasty but a little dense and chewy instead of flaky. Do you have recommendations, or ideas about what might have gone wrong.

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victor September 5, 2016 - 3:56 am

Sounds like the rolls needed a little more proofing. After shaping, let them proof until they increase in size by about 50% or more. When you press a roll with a finger, the surface should not spring right back.

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Judy Johnson August 23, 2016 - 11:12 pm

I have much better success using. KitchenAid mixer with a dough hook attachment vs. hand kneading. Could you give me an estimate how long to knead using the dough hook? Thank you! You’re very generous with your comments and helpful suggestions

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victor August 24, 2016 - 12:45 am

Judy, I would use about the same time on low speed, about 2-3 minutes. Ultimately, look for soft and supple texture and elasticity. And thank you for your kind words.

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Julie May 27, 2016 - 5:30 pm

I have looked all over, used several recipes, and my rolls have never come out as wonderfully as they did when I used this recipe. They came out perfect! From now on this will be my go to recipe for yeast rolls❤️

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victor May 27, 2016 - 8:16 pm

Glad to hear that, Julie. I have another recipe that I like a lot, here is the link: No-fail hambuger buns. You can can use it for yeast rolls and for hamburger buns. Worth giving it a try.

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KP February 29, 2016 - 12:34 am

I know a lot of comments request the old measurements, but baking (especially bread) with the weight is really how it should be done. I’m a scientific baker and I really appreciate you putting this recipe into weight. It was easy to follow, and made the most amazing rolls. I wouldn’t change a thing.

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Stephanie December 11, 2015 - 5:52 pm

So I tried these with the cups recipe the author left above in comments thinking it wouldn’t work. I even halved the recipe. The dough was so good. Second rise was great. I baked 9 rolls in an 8×8 pan for 13 mins on 375; could’ve probably left them two mins longer but they are so good! Love this recipe. Oh and I had some dough leftover that I put in muffin pan holes and baked 🙂

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victor December 11, 2015 - 9:53 pm

Glad the cups measurements worked and very happy that you liked the rolls, Stephanie. I did my best to provide very precise measurements in cups, seems like I nailed them. I still recommend weighing the ingredients, this is the absolute fool proof way, but happy that there is a workable alternative.

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Sam November 2, 2015 - 4:45 pm

I am having a hard time finding grams versus cups in tablespoons can you help with that please

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victor November 3, 2015 - 9:03 am

Sam, I provided the conversions two comments above yours. Try them.

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Pamela July 30, 2016 - 10:42 pm

Hi Sam. Here’s the measurements.
6 cups all purpose flour
2 1/4 cups water
4 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 teaspoons lemon juice
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 teaspoons active dry yeast
1 egg and 1 teaspoon water or milk for egg wash.

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Yvette October 7, 2015 - 8:29 am

I made these buns Oct 3/15. Seems like the measure for water is off. With the amount given, I had a mixture like pastry crumbles so I added more water. The result came out decent, but would like to try them again. However, now I discover the recipe has been adjusted to show only measures by weight. Unfortunately, I don’t cook/bake that way. Perhaps you could restore the recipe with the option of measuring the alternate way (I think that’s how it was when I made them), with a more accurate measure for the water??

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victor October 7, 2015 - 2:04 pm

Hi Yvette,
I am exactly the opposite, a grams and baker’s percentages kind of guy, but I will try to help.

The measures in grams are spot on, I’ve re-tested them a number of times. The caveat – using King Arthur AP flour. You need to keep in mind that different flours will have different water absorbtion rates, sometimes quite noticeably different. Flours that have been sitting around longer will lose some of their moisture and will be less hydrated, resulting in higher water absorbtion rate. If you use a different flour than I do, the rule of thumb is that the dough must be soft and supple, slightly tacky to touch but should not stick to your hands.

That said, here are the measures in cups, Tbsps and tsps, each measured twice to eliminate any possibility of a mistake. I did not save the old measures, so these are brand new, and double checked.

Flour – 900 g – 6 level cups (level, not heaping. Each level cup of KA AP flour measured 150 g)

Note: this will sound overly anal and crazy, but these measurements for flour stand true when you scoop flour from the bag with a measuring cup and remove the top. If you pour/sift the flour into a measuring cup, the weight is actually 120 g per level cup. This has to do with compression and higher density when you scoop with the cup. So, if you pour/sift into a measuring cup, you will need to use 7 1/2 level (seven and a half) cups of flour. HUGE difference. Do you see why I choose to use grams?:-)

Water – 520 g or 520 ml – 2 cups + 1/4 cup + 1 1/2 (one and a half) Tbsp
Sugar – 50 g – 4 level Tbsp
Salt – 10 g – 2 level tsp + two pinches
Active dry yeast – 18 g – 4 level tsp

Please, report your results here.

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Yvette October 7, 2015 - 9:27 pm

Thanks. Will give this another whirl & let you know!

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Kalen November 29, 2015 - 8:03 pm

I just made them with these measurements! They are wonderful! 🙂 I think next time I’ll add just a liiiittle bit more salt, but other than that, my whole family loves them!

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victor November 29, 2015 - 8:20 pm

Fantastic! They are, indeed, wonderful. Glad the measurements worked well for you. This recipe can be a little bit temperamental if using spoons and cups but once you get it right it’s a piece of cake.

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Sarah April 23, 2016 - 2:40 pm

I’ve also made them with these measurements and they turned out great. Best rolls I’ve made at home. Thanks!

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victor April 23, 2016 - 7:56 pm

Fantastic! Glad to hear it, Sarah. May I also suggest you try the burger buns recipe I posted recently? You can make them smaller and eat like dinner rolls. They are truly amazing.

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Jennifer September 28, 2015 - 3:49 pm

I followed this recipie to the letter and came out with golden brown baseballs. What happened??

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victor September 28, 2015 - 4:46 pm

Jennifer, I suspect your dough did not rise enough. The reasons could be the yeast that’s not fresh, not enough yeast, temperature during rising not warm enough. The rule of thumb is that the dough should double in volume. 2.5x the volume is good too. Too much increase and the rolls won’t have a good oven spring. After you form the rolls and let them proof for 40 minutes you should see a 1.5x volume increase or so. That’s how you know you are on the right track. They will increase further in the oven (this is known as oven spring).

To make sure the yeast is good and active, what you can do is put the yeast in a small bowl with a little bit of water and half a teaspoon of sugar. The water should be about 75-80F. After 20 minutes you should see a fair amount of foaming. If so, they yeast is good. This amount of water should be accounted for in the recipe.

Hope this helps and your next batch turns out exceptionally well.

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Maria de Lourdes September 6, 2015 - 3:56 pm

Amoooo tudo!!!

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